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Guidelines for NMARC student/community chairs

Chairing has 3 major components: an awareness campaign, identifying/surveying what your campus community might benefit from and finally, setting up your own delegation and/or solidarity march dependent on what was identified as needs previously. Instructions may differ from school to school as every institutions’ climate and systems are different. NMARC is able to answer questions and provide assistance, but it may be beneficial to ask an expert on student policies about campus-related questions. The best people to contact for a campus specific question may or may not be administrators in offices such as a dean’s office or student organization office, but also may be seasoned student activists, student organization leaders, student government officials and professors supervising student organizations.

 

1. Recruitment and awareness campaign instructions (both for your campus activities and the national march)

         -Anyone on your campus can do this, chair or not! Divide tasks to make them more  achievable with other interested parties!

         -This movement is inclusive. Reach out to greek life, multicultural organizations,                                    volunteer organizations, related classes and any and everything in-between—Do not limit your platform to the obvious and most receptive options (the women’s center, women’s rights groups, sexual assault advocates on campus, social justice orgs—These are good places to start but not to finish)

         -When hanging up flyers in campus spaces, be sure to follow school policies and post in                       only designated spaces

         -Ask teachers if you can prevent to classes

         -Send a mass email (some campuses have specific policies and instructions on how to go about this—ask your student involvement and organization office.

         -Keep in mind that some schools might only lease email server usage for mass emails and campus organizations spaces to registered student organizations. Look into registering your chapter as an organization or partnering with an already established organization that shares similar goals

2. Identifying what your campus needs

        

         Is your campus close enough to DC to easily make the trip? If not, consider a solidarity                         march over a delegation (or a group of students to attend in DC). When making this               decision, look at multiple factors such as cost, interest, time and travel distance. Listen                    to other students to make this a democratic decision.

 

3. Delegation/March instructions

         a. How to form a campus delegation:

         -Present and get the word out as much as possible—following ideas that may be                                  covered in the recruitment and awareness campaign instructions

         -Take names at campus involvement fairs and related activities (may have to be                                   registered student org. Get contact information for interested student.

         -Once a registry of interested students have been solidified, register all students at NMARC’s website to attend the national march in DC (nationalmarchagainstrapeculture.com)

         -Hold meetings leading up to the march of students attending the national march (this is                       your delegation)

         -Vote on and identify the easiest and most effective mode of transportation

         -Look into what systems of transportation may be available to you through your school or community—some schools provide vans, cars or buses to students or professors for activities. Look into these polices early as you may need to reserve a vehicle

         -See if there are any grants or scholarships or other funding available for travel

         -Have all the contact information of your delegation members

         Helpful hint: Check with your school (may be student involvement or deans’ office) on what is and isn’t okay in using your schools name or logos for such a movement—this is  crucial before you advertise officially, create or sell merchandise or make social media accounts. Some schools do not want direct affiliation of their name in student organization or similar organization titles.

Solidarity March instructions:

         Reserving space:

         -Be sure to identify if the space is designated under your school or if it’s public space

         -Identify what the needs of your community are when reserving a space (how large is it? Is it indoors? etc.)

         -Check with your dean’s office, student organization/affairs office and local /campus police for information on reserving any space you might use that is school owned

         -Keep in mind that some schools might only lease email server usage for mass emails and campus organizations spaces to registered student organizations. Look into registering your chapter as an organization or partnering with an already established organization that shares similar goals

         Following campus/town rules:

         -Be sure to follow all instructions and policies regarding a campus space, and organizing. For example, may be the campus space is only allowed to be used by students or you must not turn on mics or music too loud.            

         -Learn what is allowed or not in this space while remembering your organizing rights

         -Keep things peaceful and respectful

         -Work with police to identify if there is a threat of counter protests—we want your march to go as smoothly as possible!

         Identifying speakers and entertainment (if of interest)

         -Who is active in your community working to combat rape culture? Maybe a professor or                       professional has been an outspoken advocate—ask such an individual to participate

         -Ask campus administrators who have been championed to participate—you can use this opportunity to challenge them to uphold certain policies

         -Have campus organizations, government, local bands and musicians or area celebrities                       attend to draw a larger crowd.

         -Our movement is diverse—so too should our speakers! Diversify the industries of those                       present and survivor/ally status of speakers. Make sure that LGBTQ individuals and people of color are represented.  If possible, try to satisfy the community as well as your campus.

         Advertising:

         -Advertise to your local, state and campus papers.

         -Use any contacts that you might have to gain media attention (contacts that students,                         organizations or family members may have or if you’ve worked with a paper/reporter before)

         -Be persistent!

         -When hanging up flyers in campus spaces, be sure to follow school policies and post in                       only designated spaces

         Helpful hint: Check with your school (may be student involvement or deans’ office) on  what is and isn’t okay in using your schools name or logos for such a movement—this is  crucial before you advertise officially, create or sell merchandise or make social media accounts. Some schools do not want direct affiliation of their name in student organization or similar organization titles.

         Contact NMARC via FB message, email, Or Instagram direct message for further questions, concerns or more updates as we get closer to march day